Battles

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all
hip-hop
beatmaking
scratch
beatbox
rap
breaking
poping/loking
freestyle dance
salsa
drums
graffiti
concerts
lectures
jazz
romances
choirs
songs
Year
Date
Days
Name
Nominations
Judges
Today - 25 september 2017
2017
08 sep
1
V1 Battle 8 september 2017
Rap Freestyle 1 on 1 and 7toSmoke
06 jul
4
V1 Festival 6 - 9 July 2017
Graffiti, music day, Battle of the Gods, Breaking, Rap Battle, Funky Drummer.
X-Ecutioners, Freeze, Ivan...
27 may
1
Breaking and Rap Freestyle Battle
Breaking Master & Student, Rap Freestyle 2 vs 2, Predatorz vs Top 9.
Breaking: Storm, Ken Swift (Skype online), Crazy Legs (Skype online). Rap Freestyle: Re Pac, Timur Check, Moonstar.
19 may
1
Literary and musical project
07 apr
1
Music Cinema Battle
Professionals, Non-professionals
F.Model, N.Kachanova
12 mar
1
Rap freestyle battle
Rap Freestyle
Repak, Roa, Samorez
17 feb
1
Jazz Improvisation Battle
Battle of Jazz improvization for students and those who finished education
V. Feirtag, F. Model, K. Sineglazova
03 feb
1
Literary and musical project
2016
24 dec
1
Rap Freestyle Battle
Freestyle Rap, Rap Contest
Dj 108, Sadman, Hamil
25 nov
1
Piano Battle
19 nov
1
Salsa Battle
Salsa non professionals, Salsa professionals
Yoandy Villarutia, Eneris Mulgado, Carlos Torres
11 nov
1
Song Battle
28 oct
2
Breaking and Beatmaking battle
Beatmakers battles, Crews 5X5 battles, Universal B-boy
Ken Swift, Lardge Professor
22 oct
1
Literary and musical project
Musical-literary project
Performers L.Zhogoleva and I.Sheverdin, V.Moiseeva and M.Bakalin, A.Malikova and E.Ageichik, S.Rusanov and A.Severinov
21 oct
1
Battle of Russian Romance
05 oct
1
Literary and musical project
-
15 jul
1
Folk groups Battle
Folk groups Battle
Yakubovskaya E, Kuznecova M, Pushkarev V.
30 jun
4
V1 Festival
Graffiti, Scratch, Beatmakers, Battle of Gods, 3vs3 Juniors, 7 toSmoke, Rap, Freestyle dance, Funky Drummer, Profi 3vs3
Crazy Legs, Storm, Frankie Flave, T-Rock, Bernard Purdie, Roa, DJ D-Styles, Mr. Wiggles, Lewis Parker
25 jun
1
Choirs Battle
Choirs Battle
Stanislav Gribkov, Ekaterina Andreyeva, Anton Maksimov
29 may
1
Break Battle
4vs4 battle of Saint Petersburg dance schools, 3vs3 routines, 1vs1 breaking, 10vs10 exhibition battle
Kup, Pluto, Fast Foot
2015
19 nov
1
Breaking Battle
Popping, Top Rock City
Mr Wiggles
31 oct
1
V1 Battle
Bgirls 2 на 2, Good Foot, Seven2smoke, Routine
Machine
02 jul
4
Hip-Hop Festival
Wall Graffiti, Beatmakers, 3vs3 JUNIORS, Universal B-Boy, Rap Freestyle Battle, Freestyle dance, Funky Drummer, 3vs3 Profi, Contests
Crazy Legs, Sheff, Bernard Purdie
18 apr
1
Break Battle
2vs2 Popping, Teacher and Student (breaking), TopRock, Battle Routines, Contests
Mr Wiggles
14 feb
1
Hip-Hop Battle
7tusmok Juniors, Hip-Hop Bonnie & Clyde, 2vs2 Profi, contests (best outfit, Bonnie & Clyde Routine)
Fabrice, Sunni, FastFoot, Gimnast
2014
11 oct
2
Break Battle
3vs3 Breaking, 1vs1 Popping, Footwork 7tuSmoke, contest (acrobatic jump)
Sweepy, Frankie Flave, Lil John, Topor
06 sep
1
Break Battle
3vs3 Juniors, 1vs1 SuperSolo Profi, Step and Charleston master classes, Airflare mini-contest.
Wolt, Tsipatron,100Ballov
20 jul
1
Piano Battle
Performers’ battle, Performing skill battle, Jazz improvisation battle
L.Eremin, M.Benediktov, F.Model, E.Shvarts.
05 jul
1
Salsa Battle
Bachata, Salsa (Amateurs, Professionals), kizomba, Break vs. Salsa
Johnny Vazquez,Chiquito, Juan Matos, Nelson Flores
19 jun
4
Hip-Hop Festival
Graffiti, caricatures, DJ battle, beatmakers, beatbox, breakdance (3vs3 Juniors, 3vs3 Profi, univ. b-boy, freestyle dance), moonwalk contest, funky drummer, rap battle
Qbert,Alien Ness, T-Rock, Exile, Decl, Venum, Yan the Shrimp, Flaco, Calle
26 apr
1
Break Battle
2vs2 Teacher vs Student, 2vs2 Breaking Routine, contests (6step, squat, munch mills)
Xisco, AT, Nord Diamond
19 apr
1
Piano Battle
Performers (from 2 to 6 years of training), Performers (from 7 to 10 years of training), Performing skill battle, Jazz improvisation battle, Improvisations on popular music melodies
V.Sheverdin, E.Shvarts, I.Lebedev, L.Eremin
12 apr
1
Song Battle
Soviet songs, folk songs, mini-contest: Songs about Space, Foreign songs
M.Lukonin, E.Yaskunova, L.Eremin
14 mar
2
Salsa Battle
Bachata, Cha-cha-cha, Jive, Salsa, Tres Muchachos concert
Israel Gutierrez, Maja Cukovic, Yoandy Villaurrutia
25 feb
1
Scratch Battle
Break Battle, 7toSmoke, Scratch battle, Jam by DJ ShortKUT
ShortKUT (USA), Top9
01 feb
2
Break Battle
Beatmakers, 2vs2 Juniors (up to 2 years of training), 2vs2 Freestyle dance, CREW vs CREW, Backspin, windmill
Maurizio, BMB akaSpaceKid, Scotch
2013
28 sep
2
Break Battle
2vs2 Juniors, Bonnie and Clyde, 1vs1 beatmakers, universal b-boy, beatboxers, 1vs1 Michael Jackson style, drummers, 1vs1 freestyle dance, crew vs crew.
Phantom, Focus, Mouse, P.Talapaev, BMB Spacekid
13 sep
1
Bards Tournament
Authors, Performers
S.Sinelnikov, M.Semenenko, V.Levi
24 aug
1
Break Jam
Jam
Well B, Killa Kolya, Tony Rock
13 jul
1
Break Battle
2vs2 Juniors mix, Drummers’ Battle, 1vs1 Freestyle Dance, 1vs1 Footwork, Break vs Salsa Battle
Well, Disco-T, Nadya
11 jul
1
Salsa Battle
Salsa pairs (professionals, amateurs), salsa solo (men, women), reggaeton solo, Break vs Salsa battle
Maykel Fonts, Inaki Fernandez, Henry Knowles
16 may
4
Hip-hop Festival
Wall and board graffiti, calligraphy, caricatures, scratch battle, rap battle, Juniors up to 2 years of training, Juniors more than 2 years of training, TopRock selection Profi 3vs3, Russia vs World battle
Phantom, Qbert, Killafornia, T-Rock, Ata, Massa, Mister Мaloy, Sasha Trun, Victor Splash
27 apr
1
Break-Battle
2vs2 Teacher-Student, 10vs10 Moscow-St Petersburg Battle
Gormon, Simpson, Freeze
11 apr
1
Karaoke Battle
Amateurs – Men, Amateurs – Women, Professionals – Men, Professionals – Women
L.Eremin
16 mar
1
Salsa Battle
Amateurs, Pro-Am, Professionals
About the project Events calendar Workshop References

News

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19 sep Hip-Hop Evolution Documentary
Hip-Hop Evolution is a four-part Canadian music documentary series, which aired on HBO Canada in 2016.

Hosted by Canadian rapper and broadcaster Shad, the series profiles the history of hip-hop music through interviews with many of the genre's leading cultural figures.

The series was screened at the 2016 Hot Docs Canadian International Documentary Festival[2] before being picked up for broadcast by HBO. In December 2016, it was added to Netflix for international distribution

Hip-Hop Evolution features in-depth, personal interviews with the progenitors of DJing, rapping, and production, culminating in what is now taken to be Hip hop music and rap, adding to the existing understanding of hip-hip's earliest decades. Such original artists, producers, DJs, and promoters include DJ Kool Herc, Coke La Rock, Grandmaster Flash and The Furious Five, Fab Five Freddy, Marley Marl, Afrika Bambaataa, Kool Moe Dee, Kurtis Blow, Doug E. Fresh, Whodini, Warp 9, DJ Hollywood, Spoonie Gee, The Sugarhill Gang, and Russell Simmons.

The first episode documents the history of the inceptive hip-hop party at 1520 Sedgewick Ave in The Bronx where DJ Kool Herc, who thus emerged as a godfather of the tradition, DJed his sister's birthday party.

The series went on to feature some of the most influential artists of the genre, without whom its current form would not exist, such as Public Enemy, Beastie Boys, N.W.A, Ice-T, Rakim, Big Daddy Kane and LL Cool J, as well as documenting Schooly D, from Philadelphia, as the influence for Gangster Rap on the West Coast, as told by the words of Ice T. It limits it telling of the history at that point, as it documents that was the turning point in which Hip Hop had turned from an underground movement within music to a mainstream genre, that ripples its influence throughout contemporary culture.

The series garnered three Canadian Screen Award nominations at the 5th Canadian Screen Awards in 2017, for Best Biography or Arts Documentary Program or Series, Best Editing in a Documentary Program or Series (Steve Taylor and Mark Staunton) and Best Direction in a Documentary or Factual Series (Darby Wheeler). It won the awards for Best Biography or Arts Documentary and Best Editing.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hip-Hop_Evolution

10 sep "How We Create B-boying" by B-boy Batch
My story regarding The Bronx Boys always remains the same. I tell the same thing now as I told it twenty years ago.

My story regarding The Bronx Boys always remains the same. I tell the same thing now as I told it twenty years ago.

The Bronx Boys was a graffiti crew and we also danced Uprock. One time when my little bro TT Rock danced he went around and then turned 360 degrees in the air around his axis and losing his balance fell on the floor. It was like gravitation was discovered thanks to the falling apple. It is almost impossible to believe. When TT Rock fell we started falling after him imitating this motion.
The first thing you do when you fall is try doing some moves to save yourself from the fall. When he fell we thought he had done it on purpose but it wasn't so. He did a certain move so he wouldn't hurt himself and that was breathtaking. Joking and laughing at little TT we started falling on the floor and began doing some crazy things which we didn't even know what they were, but it caught everybody's attention. All of us were attracted by the fact that this something could be further developed. When I tell this story people ask me: "Where did you get it from?". But this is how it was, just like in the story with an apple and gravitation.
There are a lot of unbelievable thing happening in life and I'm trying to explain it to people but most of them are just not ready to understand it because now it has grown in something global. I couldn't even imagine that it would lead to anything after all The Bronx Boys were just wild dancing youngsters with guns doing crazy stuff. And it is amazing how it all transformed into something so beautiful and positive. After this particular fall we renamed "The Bronx Boys Graffiti Crew" into "The Bronx Boys Rocking Crew" because now we experimented with all these crazy moves, trying to understand how people can make some sort of dance out of this. As strange as it was by 1976 it began spreading all over Bronx. At that time many crews started to pop up. It wasn't "Break Dance", no, it was called "Rock". Why? Because this dance came out from "Uprock" which was popular at that time: we danced it against one another, used it in cyphers, pretending to be shooting a shotgun. It was almost like a fight without violence.
If you ask me about the history of Uprock or Toprock, I wouldn't give you much information. We have people my senior, they can tell how it all developed. I'm just telling the story of the Bronx Boys Rocking Crew. When crews started to appear, they weren't called "Breaking" or "Break Dancing". Every t-shirt said "Rock", Starchild La Rock - one of the first crews. Actually this is the second b-boy crew, I don't know whether Trac 2 realizes it or not. I never heard anything about Salsoul, don't know where they came from like I always said, but I respect all the brothers. I'm not going to monopolize this culture because it is neither about me nor about the Bronx Boys Rocking Crew.
If anything, all the credit should go to the founders of Hip-Hop culture, Afrika Bambaataa and Kool Herc. Both of them are the founding fathers. But I'm not hiding anything, just telling our story about the Bronx Boys Rocking Crew. We smoked weed, did crazy stuff, went to jail. This is what was happening in Bronx back then: burned down buildings, poverty and widespread degradation. Most of my friends left this world or ended up in jail - and it all has transformed into something so amazingly beautiful. Some people praise me, they want to make me a king, but all respect goes to you, the new generation. You took it and turned it into something complete which helps the society through community centers and so on. I want to say "Thank you for this".
Afrika Bambaataa and Zulu Nation are the ones who fascinated me and had the most influence on me, since they were even before the TBB. Back then I used to go to Zulu jams organized by the Zulu Nation, a massive organization of people. There we danced Freak and some other stuff. It was 1973, the time when cuts and mixing were being only introduced
to DJing, the time when Afrika Bambaataa and DJ Kool Herc gave birth to this culture. We became the ones who supported the foundation of the culture, we came to jams and rocked. It was Afrika Bambaata thanks to whom I and the TBB came into picture. He fascinated me by the scale of his movement and by the fact that he had the name of the founding father. He turned Black Spades into Zulu Nation. He got tired of the shit, excuse my vulgar language, he got tired of all the negativity. He had a purpose, he did it for the community, for the people. To a certain extent I was trying to do the same, but I wasn't so organized as this brother since he was much older than me and had much more experience. We were just little kids, we smoked, danced and looked for someone to con. I just want to give people the idea of how it really is, so that everyone would know that this culture which started with bad intentions has turned into a phenomenal positive energy.
It makes me sad that Afrika Bambaataa has forgotten one story which is important to me and which I remember perfectly. It was a historic moment for me and I mentioned it in my commentary several times. It was a meeting with a person who was a big inspiration to me. In 1977 Afrika Bambaataa invited me for a talk in Webster Projects. I arrived together with my people, I was pointed towards Afrika Bambaataa and I came over to him and asked, "Excuse me, are you Afrika Bambaataa?". "Yeah, what do you want", he asked in return. He just saw us as kids, since he was much older. I said that he invited us to talk. "Wait a minute. Who are you?", Bambaataa asked. I answered, "I am Batch, president of the TBB Rocking Crew". Bambaataa started laughing and said pointing at my guys, "Is this your crew?". I said, "Yeah, you called for us". Then he stood up and said, "Listen, do you think it's possible that your crew and my people can unite for the survival and safety of the kids in the streets?". I froze and just kept staring at him, because I had seen him before but never met in person. I looked at my two vice-presidents and said, "No problem, what do you want me to do?". "Just let your people know that from the moment of this meeting we are together", answered Bambaataa.
I just want to show my utmost respect not only to TBB, not only to Zulu Nation and not only to all those crews who make so many positive things for the world. I want to show my utmost respect on a global scale to everyone who is involved in this amazing culture, to those who are involved and help the community trough this dance art form called "Rocking". Each one of you can do something different for the community. I want people to change the minds of young guys for the better through this culture, wherever they go, help one another, live with each other, live in diversity, peace, love, unity and respect. Not one of us is perfect, even gods are not perfect, even mighty Lord Jesus Christ gave in to temptation once.
Because of my lifestyle I can relate practically to everything. I know what it's like to live behind bars, I know what it's like to lose dear friends, I know what it's like to be beaten up by the police because police brutality was crazy back in those days. I'm not justifying this, all of it was wrong. All I want to say is that we can do something different, conscious and positive in relation to everything around us in a beautiful way.

TBB is very important because it contains a powerful energy. But if it wasn't for Aby TBB would not survive. The same goes for Crazy Legs. I love Crazy Legs because if he didn't bring this culture back in the 80's, then TBB wouldn't probably be existent now. He was the one who gave life to it.

I just want people all over the world to know the most important thing: the name of this dance is not "Break Dance", it is called "Rocking". Learn your history, I have already given dozens of comments on this subject. I put all of my energy so that the world would know what
this dance is all about. Some people get confused when they find out that Rock Steady Crew is one of the most prominent crews which came out from TBB. Rock Steady Crew is the most popular, even more popular than TBB, since Crazy Legs protected for so long.

I will always tell only the truth. If there is anyone who can tell me about the birth of this dance, please let's sit together and you will tell me about the foundation of this dance. I'm saying this in a very respectable way. But if you have another story about the way this dance appeared, I would really like to know it.
Peace and love.

Source: www.solo138.com

04 sep The Genius B-boy Ivan
Me and Ivan are very close friends. We used to go to the clubs where bboys hung out, music was being played and no one paid attention to ...

Me and Ivan are very close friends. We used to go to the clubs where bboys hung out, music was being played and no one paid attention to us. Ivan said that in this atmosphere he feels himself at ease.

 In my opinion, which I shared with him before, Ivan is so brilliant in his personality and in the way he understands music, so much higher above everyone else, that he is just lonely at his level. His level is so high, that I think he cannot even have a relationship with people so he has to sink to the level of others to communicate. That is why sometimes he is considered crazy, when in reality he is very, very smart. I thinks it's a pity that I know what he is capable of but he never shows it. For example, everybody knows how good Ynot is at Toprock, but I think that Ivan is better. Not that their levels are about the same, but Ivan is much better. I have many videos where you can see that, but it's better to see it live. He doesn't like it when people film him dancing. It is weird because most of us want to be on camera. We want respect, acknowledgment whereas he doesn't worry about it at all. He doesn't mind if you think that all that he does is just acrobatics.


The first time Ivan and Kmel battled, Ivan had not danced for about six months. When Kmel called him out Ivan wasn't in a good shape.
One time Ivan met one of my friends who was a churchgoer. He invited him to church and they went. I don't know what happened there but they started to believe that Hip-Hop is a sin. This friend, who was a graffiti artist, said that he wouldn't write anymore, because God doesn't want us to be involved in Hip-Hop, since it is a very egoistic activity. After Ivan went to church he also started to believe it. This was in 1998 right before Bboy Summit which took place in February of 1999. Ivan sold everything, all of his b-boy clothes... The turntables he sold to me. He dropped everything related to Hip-Hop. He went to church and stopped his Hip-Hop training. Just before Bboy Summit he began to come back and dance a little bit. In my opinion it was an unfair battle, because it would be the same if he had called out Ivan when he was sick. But Kmel didn't know this, so it's not his fault. I think that Kmel could not smoke Ivan in any way, because I know what Ivan is capable of.


I don't know why, but Ivan didn't show himself off. A few months before the battle he was in Los Angeles. I saw and I know that he could still do everything he had done before. Back then he was teaching workshops and he just blew my mind. I think he realized that he had to do a show.


Speaking of changing clothes during the battle I think that Kmel has a certain character for that. He is “brat”, “boogie brat”. In my opinion, in terms of strategy Kmel won because he dictated the rules. Battle is a psychological thing. Ivan should have done something which would make Kmel feel stupid. Strategy and psychology are very important in the battle. Ivan understands that but he is so advanced that all these things are just toys to him. He doesn't want to play with them, he doesn't care whether people understand it or not.


We all talk about music. Of course, we all love music, but Ivan's love to music is just at another level. One time before another of his tours he came to my home to compile a mix for his performance. He had a box of CDs, he also could utilize all my vinyl, he could use turntables, CD turntables (it was before Serato). In order to make a 10-minute mix he closed himself in my room for a whole day. He worked with music in such a way as if he has a real connection with it. He definitely has a really close connection with music. Kmel is great, but what he did in the battle was just a trick. Ivan didn't want to waste time on this, he didn't care about it.


If you were to watch Ivan's old videos, you would see that he is so high above everybody else that when he comes out nobody reacts since nobody understood him. Toprock and dancetivity weren't in style back then. I think it is Ynot who made Toprock popular. It is strange that so many people talk about musicality but they themselves don't understand it. They are just repeating after somebody else.


Ivan is my most powerful inspiration, first of all because he really does it for himself. Sometimes it makes me sad, since I want to see him show his full potential against someone like Kmel.


If you watch Ivan's DVD and see the way it's done, you would realize that there is history in it. It contains his powermoves, his tricks, acrobatics and in the end credits there are clips where he really rocks. There he shows the truth. He said that in the beginning of the DVD you get something you already know whereas in the end of the DVD he shows you something you need to know. He produced this DVD himself and the way it is done is already genius.
He learned to dance from his brothers. Ivan grew up in the atmosphere of party rocking. He said that before he found out about Breaking there was party rocking. That's why he dances everything: popping, locking... His main inspiration are his brothers since he is the youngest of them.

24 aug Ken Swift About Big Corporations and Respect in Bboying
I think that breaking will evolve but more within the framework of sports. They already want it to be a sport. Remember my words. I said ...

I think that breaking will evolve but more within the framework of sports. They already want it to be a sport. Remember my words. I said it five years ago and I tell it in my every class - breaking is not a sport, it is a dance.

Breaking requires music, in sports music is unessential, athletes don't dance to rhythm of the music. We have founded a culture built on music, this is an art form which brings everybody together. So how can you take a dance, an art form, and call it sport?! This is not a sport. But most corporations need a market, they look for potential clientele. The age between 8 and 30 is a huge age gap. Just think about it. Sometimes up to 40 years! This is unique. A regular dancing period takes from 6 to 20 years and that's it. The career of the most ballet and other dancers is very short, whereas breaking is so fresh and raw that b-boys keep dancing until the age of 50 and even longer. It might not make sense but this is the way it is. So these corporations just do their thing, they take these opportunities. One thing when these are kids of the age from 8 to 15, they don't have much money, their parents buy them everything. But in our case we have parents with their children as well as adults. This is a very big gap. So this is just a market. The corporations sell their damn t-shirts, drinks, phones. They all want a piece of this market. They don't think about nurturing this culture or giving the kids an understanding of this culture. They only think about the ways to sell the phones to the kids, the ways to foist the Nikes: "Let's make them think about our products". 

This is simply business. Я understand it, I'm not angry with them. But I just want everybody from our community to realize it. Most people don't even care about it. Everyone thanks Silverback. But for what? It's them who should be thanking us. We are the ones who help them do things. They are nothing without us. Every billionaire is nothing without a talent. We don't need them, we have been doing it all this time without anybody. I just want the dancers and people in Hip-Hop to be aware of this. I'm not saying: "Don't take money from these corporations!" If you won 20 000$, great, take it, buy yourself a house. I'm not saying: "Don't work with them". I'm just saying: "Understand they way this machine works". In this culture we take care of each other, but the corporations don't care about us. This is not their job. Their job is to sell the product. Ten years ago I was pissed-off but now I understand everything. Okay, you want to sell Red Bull? Go ahead, sell it! 

Our community needs not only to be talented but smart as well. We need to see what's going on and stop blindly going on a leash of corporations. They know what I'm talking about. The know that I know. I'm older. I faced all of this back in the 80's. I'm the one who has burned himself on this and I understand that other will burn themselves as well. When you burn yourself you learn. I see this situation, but when I tell about this to our community they think I'm just an old man who is angry with the whole world. Yes, I'm an older person who doesn't want you young people to make mistakes. This is why I can't be heard. Yet I try to tell this to the people every chance I get. Sometimes in my classes I say that we need each other, there is no need to think, that if we don't have these rich people then we won't have Hip-Hop. We will have Hip-Hop. It has been with us all this time, out of nothing. We started out of nothing and kept it going. However, they don't support us, they are interested only in money. That's why they want to be part of us. If you want to help us moneywise pay for the sound, thanks. Don't tell us to wear some shirt and play some produced music instead of vinyl or that the judges have to be the winners of the previous contest. Little by little this rules change everything. If we don't speak up we are going to lose our culture. 

Gradually they take little details at every event. Silverback takes place in a non-Hip-Hop venue, this is not Hip-Hop environment, this is the environment of computer technology, Uber etc. There is no graffiti, there is no art and culture. Yet everybody
is happy. Girls in bikini come out, Oh, nice tits! I can understand this, but the fact that girls in bikini come out between battles may not appeal to the most of the women at the jam. This is goddamn disrespectful! There are also lots of gay people who are going to be upset that gays don't come out instead of this girls. There is a gay community out there in the world, this is a fact, we can't deny it. Gay people live on our planet and they are everywhere. So the fact that they display half-naked women means something. This is not a good message for the young generation. Just imagine kids watching a battle and afterwards seeing big boobs. Women come out to shake their fat asses and big boobs - what is the message behind it? But if one girl were to say that she doesn't like how they exploit a woman's body at the event, the whole community will call her a hater who doesn't want to help. This way she would understand that it's better not to voice your opinion. Renegade, Cross, everybody simply attacks you. "Why don't you just support it? Why are you hating all the time?" No, you are not hating, you are just expressing your opinion. This is how they try to make you afraid. If you speak up you will be attacked. This is not only the problem of Hip-Hop history but of the life itself. The people who usually tell the truth get attacked and silenced by others. They need silence. This is what happens in our community. Only recently I saw how some girl expressed her ideas about Silverback saying that it had certain flaws. And these people replied: "Screw all haters, people can't appreciate the help which is given to us". This makes me feel disappointed inside. In the next few years we are going to see further changes. 

I like it when people sit down and think: "Can we do something that is interesting, thrilling, artistic?" - this is our community. "What can we do in a new way, what new contest can we organize, what dancer can we invite?" - this is Hip-Hop. When good ideas come true the dancers come with their families and kids - this is the community. 

The main reason why I judged at Silverbak was that I was paid for the flight to the East Coast so I could see my son. They offered very little money for my judging, this wasn't my price. But we have a saying "Cutting off the nose to spite the face", which means I wouldn't act like I deserved something since they offered me a chance to see my son. I wanted to see my son. The plane ticket was the only reason why I agreed to be a judge at Silverback. I don't lie their business model. My manager asked them for my contract but they didn't want to acknowledge me as a professional. Under the contract they would have to pay me as a consultant who would advise what is what every month of the quarter which means three cheques a year. Hire me as a professional, don't ask me on the phone how you should deal with your problems. Yet they couldn't even clearly explain what it was they wanted from me. All they want to do is to mess with your head, like they did to Lino, Cross, Speedy Legs and other promoters in the country, so we would agree to answer their questions for a plane ticket and a small fee. I have been doing this for almost forty years and I'm not going to just sit down and tell you what and how you should do. You need to pay if you want my advice. This is consulting. So my manager told me not to get involved but I decided against "cutting of my nose" and agreed to a small fee and asked to book me a return flight a week later. This way I would spend the week with my son and then come back. I just wanted to see my son and I saved some money on the plane ticket. You can trust me this is the only reason I did that twice. Last year I said that I didn't like Silverback and they didn't invite me this year. 

The same goes for Red Bull BC One. After that incident involving bottles I told my manager that if Red Bull people contact me again he should tell them that I want 20 000 for the judging. The incident took place in Paris when Lilou threw a hat at his opponent and then cocked the judges and his friends started throwing the water bottles at us. The security didn't do anything about this. Red Bull didn't punish Lilou for such disrespectful behavior. I was one of those people who brought Hip-Hop in this country in 1981. Is this acceptable to act so disrespectfully? It is the same thing as saying «fuck you» to your own granddad. Nobody punished him, nobody told him that he was wrong, that he couldn't do such things. He just walked away and when the contest was over I immediately went upstairs, took a knife and put it in my pocket. This French pricks could simply jump on you anytime. They were angry with the judges because Lilou had lost. I didn't feel safe that's why I took the knife. I didn't have anybody with me back there even some sort of security. If one of those freaks came up to me I would have stabbed him. We judges walked there by ourselves, there wasn't anybody who would have walked us out. We got up from our chairs and found ourselves alone in this huge crowd. I felt the danger and I didn't like it at all. I never had this feeling before as a judge. I always feel love from my community. But over there I felt that I was in danger. I found my buddy from New-York and we left the place.
 
After this nobody from Red Bull contacted me and nobody did anything about what had happened. He cocked while being on the air. Millions of people saw a b-boy flipping off a pioneer or pioneers. This is not acceptable in the Hip-Hop culture, but nobody stopped it. So I am ready to work with them, but they will have to pay me 20 000. I know that they won't pay me this kind of money. If Thomas calls my manager will just tell him this sum and that's it. I don't really care and I'm not going to get involved in this. I wasn't concerned with Lilou but with the company. The responsibility of the company is your protection. Yet we were in danger. When those people threw bottles at us they should have been escorted out of the venue. They were really close. Around twenty bottles were thrown at the judges. If one of these bottles got in my face I would have sued this goddamn Red Bull company and become rich. The Security people let it slide: "All is fine, don't worry about it". In Hip-Hop culture we have to have respect for seniors. We need to show respect the same way we show respect to our fathers and grandfathers. Even if your granddad is a prick you have to show respect. There are different levels of respect. If I am your granddad and my opinion is stupid I am still your granddad, the father of your mother. So you have to show respect. This is what I'm talking about, these corporations have no rules. They do not accept the laws of our community. The law of my community says: "Dude, I understand that you are upset but you need to take it easy, you can't disrespect the people who help this community grow. Please, understand this". When I was growing up and encountered problems with people, seniors like Fable always took care of it: "You can't act like that, bro. Don't do it again. It is unacceptable in our culture. You will have to apologize". I have met Lilou since then but he never apologized. What kind of a man or humble Muslim is he? "You are fake". All this religiousness is fake. He uses his religiousness to impress people? I don't do things like this in Hip-Hop. But now it has become a norm. If you were a humble Muslim you would say: "I was angry, I am just a man, I am sorry". I would have said: "Peace". I understand, you have lots of energy and passion just like in the war. But he never came up to me. He just flipped off everybody and the French supported him on the internet. The lesson didn't wasn't learned. No order.

16 aug Bboy News at YouTube
The new YouTube channel Bboy News has been increasingly gaining in popularity. The channel has been started under the initiative of famou...

The new YouTube channel Bboy News has been increasingly gaining in popularity. The channel has been started under the initiative of famous bboys from California Casper and Smurf. The first video was posted in the spring of 2017 and since then three or four videos have been uploaded each month. 

Bboy News could be regarded as a comedy show where bboy Smurf characteristically makes fun of amusing moments which has recently taken place in the world breaking scene as well as talks about bboy news and takes interviews. Smurf is assisted by his old friend Casper. Kid David is also a frequent guest on this show. 
The show is still fresh and it has not yet stood the test of time, but it has already proven to be a respected alternative to similar popularized channels. In truth Bboy News is a unique project of its kind. It is oriented towards the underground segment of the global breaking community and gives a mature take on the objective processes within the modern breaking scene. 

Link to YouTube channel Bboy News: 
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCwaVQg9GAbGz5sJS5xwa..

14 aug Hip Hop is 44
On August 11, 1973 in South Bronx, New-York a party took place which is considered to be the first Hip-Hop jam in History. The venue, rec...
  • On August 11, 1973 in South Bronx, New-York a party took place which is considered to be the first Hip-Hop jam in History. The venue, recreation room of an apartment building at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue , is now regarded as the birthplace of Hip-Hop and the person who organized the party - the godfather of this culture. 


  • Well-known DJ Kool Herc was a Jamaican immigrant who settled with his family in South Bronx in early 70's. He became famous for being the first person to mix popular music among Afro and Latino communities in such a way that the most noticeable and energetic parts were played whereas less energetic moments simply got cut out. On top of that, he put certain parts, such as breaks, on repeat by putting the needles from the end to the beginning. He called this trick "Merry Go Round". Back then such style was an absolute revolution and it became the origin of a new musical genre. 


  • Kool Herc is also one of the first MCs in Hip-Hop. In his sets he used the mic and encouraged the audience to raise their voices by making jokes and fooling around. It was especially well-timed when he put the needle from the end of the vinyl to the beginning. 


  • Kool Herc's parties were gaining in popularity and proved to be the coolest jams in Bronx. As a result there was not enough room in the recreation room, so Herc started throwing jams in the street. It started bringing together the Latino and Afro-American communities which were not exactly on friendly terms at that time. 
    DJ is the person who lays the foundation for everything in Hip-Hop. Music has always been the main inspiring force of any youth subculture. When music changes the dance changes with it. This was the case with Herc. His mixes of break parts, i.e. song portions where the vocals and all the instruments except for the drums and possibly bass are silent, laid the ground for the birth of a new dance. The break means "pause", i.e. the moment of the song without the actual song. In pop music the break is an instrumental or a percussion section with a song. Such a break is usually placed within the sections of the song to provide the feeling of anticipation and signal the beginning of a new section or create diversity in the song structure. In that way the thing which was considered the most unimportant part of the music was used by the founding fathers of Hip-Hop as the primary source for creation of a whole new genre in music. 
    The "Merry Go Round" style of playing or as it later was called Break-Beat was defined by growing vitality and called for a separate dance. In the most energetic moments of the song the moves of the dancers become more energetic as well. Almost in every dance, especially in the community kinds of dance, there is a moment of the explosion of energy when the dancer goes down, gets on his hands and starts doing acrobatic tricks. Usually this moments do not take long since they demand certain level of sportsmanship and they are limited by the music. But now the music part is longer, so the energy explosion moment becomes longer as well. When Herc played his breaks on repeat on the dance floor the cyphers were formed by b-boys (break boys) who were waiting for this exact moment. Thus a new dance movement started its development. 
    The term b-boy (break-boy) was introduced by Kool Herc himself and it means a guy who is doing something out of the ordinary. This is the way this new dance could be described - out of the ordinary. 

    Therefore at Kool Herc's parties the groundwork was laid for the future Hip-Hop culture, and the starting point of all this was that first party on August 11, 1973. It was the root, the origin but it is still not entirely valid to regard this date as the birthday of Hip-Hop. At that time such trends could be seen all over Bronx as well as beyond it. People threw parties, experimented with vinyl, made rhymes in the mic - such trends could be noticed anywhere , they were flowing in the air as well as in people's

  • minds. However, Kool Herc's parties were the most crowded and revolutionary but it still was not called Hip-Hop. It did not even look like a new subculture, it was just a discotheque. The people who spent time there could not even imagine that someday this would evolve into something this massive and colossal. 

    More defining features, cultural form and organized nature of this movement were introduced by the organization called "Zulu Nation" headed by another godfather of Hip-Hop Afrika Bambaataa. Their goal was to bring together the communities of South Bronx and other poor districts of New-York which were divided by crime and drug addiction. They tried to redirect the energy of the young generation from the negative to the positive and transform their urge to destroy into the urge to create. The Zulu organization attempted to form a general trend of development of this organized subculture using the most popular trends of the time, namely DJing, MCing, B-boying and Graffiti. In truth, Zulu Nation was massive and mature enough in comparison with other youth cultures. Zulu had a plan and resources. Their jams became the most crowded and their motto was "Peace, unity, love and having fun". They called the new movement "Hip-Hop" and propagated it through four active elements - DJing, MCing, B-boying and Graffiti. 
    November 12, 1973 is considered to be the day of Zulu Nation formation and November 12, 1974 - the day of formation of Hip-Hop culture as an organized movement.

14 aug Hip Hop is 44
On August 11, 1973 in South Bronx, New-York a party took place which is considered to be the first Hip-Hop jam in History. The venue, rec...
  • On August 11, 1973 in South Bronx, New-York a party took place which is considered to be the first Hip-Hop jam in History. The venue, recreation room of an apartment building at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue , is now regarded as the birthplace of Hip-Hop and the person who organized the party - the godfather of this culture. 


  • Well-known DJ Kool Herc was a Jamaican immigrant who settled with his family in South Bronx in early 70's. He became famous for being the first person to mix popular music among Afro and Latino communities in such a way that the most noticeable and energetic parts were played whereas less energetic moments simply got cut out. On top of that, he put certain parts, such as breaks, on repeat by putting the needles from the end to the beginning. He called this trick "Merry Go Round". Back then such style was an absolute revolution and it became the origin of a new musical genre. 


  • Kool Herc is also one of the first MCs in Hip-Hop. In his sets he used the mic and encouraged the audience to raise their voices by making jokes and fooling around. It was especially well-timed when he put the needle from the end of the vinyl to the beginning. 


  • Kool Herc's parties were gaining in popularity and proved to be the coolest jams in Bronx. As a result there was not enough room in the recreation room, so Herc started throwing jams in the street. It started bringing together the Latino and Afro-American communities which were not exactly on friendly terms at that time. 


  • DJ is the person who lays the foundation for everything in Hip-Hop. Music has always been the main inspiring force of any youth subculture. When music changes the dance changes with it. This was the case with Herc. His mixes of break parts, i.e. song portions where the vocals and all the instruments except for the drums and possibly bass are silent, laid the ground for the birth of a new dance. The break means "pause", i.e. the moment of the song without the actual song. In pop music the break is an instrumental or a percussion section with a song. Such a break is usually placed within the sections of the song to provide the feeling of anticipation and signal the beginning of a new section or create diversity in the song structure. In that way the thing which was considered the most unimportant part of the music was used by the founding fathers of Hip-Hop as the primary source for creation of a whole new genre in music. 

  • The "Merry Go Round" style of playing or as it later was called Break-Beat was defined by growing vitality and called for a separate dance. In the most energetic moments of the song the moves of the dancers become more energetic as well. Almost in every dance, especially in the community kinds of dance, there is a moment of the explosion of energy when the dancer goes down, gets on his hands and starts doing acrobatic tricks. Usually this moments do not take long since they demand certain level of sportsmanship and they are limited by the music. But now the music part is longer, so the energy explosion moment becomes longer as well. When Herc played his breaks on repeat on the dance floor the cyphers were formed by b-boys (break boys) who were waiting for this exact moment. Thus a new dance movement started its development. 


  • The term b-boy (break-boy) was introduced by Kool Herc himself and it means a guy who is doing something out of the ordinary. This is the way this new dance could be described - out of the ordinary. 

    Therefore at Kool Herc's parties the groundwork was laid for the future Hip-Hop culture, and the starting point of all this was that first party on August 11, 1973. It was the root, the origin but it is still not entirely valid to regard this date as the birthday of Hip-Hop. At that time such trends could be seen all over Bronx as well as beyond it. People threw parties, experimented with vinyl, made rhymes in the mic - such trends could be noticed anywhere , they were flowing in the air as well as in people's

  • minds. However, Kool Herc's parties were the most crowded and revolutionary but it still was not called Hip-Hop. It did not even look like a new subculture, it was just a discotheque. The people who spent time there could not even imagine that someday this would evolve into something this massive and colossal. 

    More defining features, cultural form and organized nature of this movement were introduced by the organization called "Zulu Nation" headed by another godfather of Hip-Hop Afrika Bambaataa. Their goal was to bring together the communities of South Bronx and other poor districts of New-York which were divided by crime and drug addiction. They tried to redirect the energy of the young generation from the negative to the positive and transform their urge to destroy into the urge to create. The Zulu organization attempted to form a general trend of development of this organized subculture using the most popular trends of the time, namely DJing, MCing, B-boying and Graffiti. In truth, Zulu Nation was massive and mature enough in comparison with other youth cultures. Zulu had a plan and resources. Their jams became the most crowded and their motto was "Peace, unity, love and having fun". They called the new movement "Hip-Hop" and propagated it through four active elements - DJing, MCing, B-boying and Graffiti. 


  • November 12, 1973 is considered to be the day of Zulu Nation formation and November 12, 1974 - the day of formation of Hip-Hop culture as an organized movement.

03 aug Топ 10 Хип-хоп книг, о которых не все знают
Многие утверждают, что написанное слово является пятым элементом Хип-хопа, и если это верно, то любая документация о культуре квалифициру...

Many argue that the written word is the fifth element of hip-hop, and if that rings true, then any solid documentation about the culture qualifies as a contribution to the elements. To help bulk up your hip-hop library. Check the selections and stack them on your bookshelf or e-reader.

‘Can’t Stop Won’t Stop: A History of the Hip-Hop Generation,’ Jeff Chang, DJ Kool Herc

This 2005 book is a no-brainer for any hip-hop bookworm. Jeff Chang traces hip-hop’s earliest roots and documents the progression of the culture through its many changes. The photos are equally informative and the book reads like a literary timeline. Then there’s the intro by DJ Kool Herc, which lays a solid foundation. It’s the size of a textbook, with just about as much information as one.


‘Hip Hop America,’ Nelson George

Author Nelson George’s book ‘The Death of Rhythm and Blues’ shed light on the musical shift that was happening with R&B. In ‘Hip Hop America,’ published in 1998, he approaches hip-hop in a similar fashion but with greater focus on rap’s cultural impact. While some of the discussions in the book — particularly on women in hip-hop — are slightly dated, the historical info and George’s anecdotes are worth the read.


‘How to Draw Hip Hop,’ Damion Scott, kris ex

When comic artist Damion Scott and hip-hop literati kris ex approached the concept of visually encompassing hip-hop, it didn’t stop at graffiti. Scott’s flair for animation and kris ex’s instructions make this a how-to book for anyone curious about entering the graphic side of hip-hop. There’s graffiti, anime and comic book elements in this 144-page 2006 manual. Get your sketchbook ready.


‘Hip Hoptionary TM: The Dictionary of Hip Hop Terminology,’ Alonzo Westbrook

Tools like urbandictionary.com offer some insight into the vernacular of many subcultures. However, 2002’s ‘Hip Hoptionary’ is a book of terms that pertain specifically to hip-hop. Of course, the words in this dictionary are dated now, but it’s a fun, little read-through for anyone looking for some hip-hop words to toss around. From slang to standard English, this book is meant to educate and entertain.


‘Decoded,’ Jay-Z, dream hampton

One of the most mystical figures in hip-hop finally decided to break down his lyrics for the masses in 2010. Jay-Z‘s ‘Decoded’ takes some of Hov’s most popular (and confusing) lyrics and breaks them down in his own words. The intermittent discussion points are also pertinent information to truly understand the mind of a hip-hop genius. Line drawings and photographs are sprinkled throughout the rapper’s work.


‘The Wu-Tang Manual,’ The RZA, Chris Norris

Another guide to understanding an otherwise enigmatic hip-hop group: The RZA breaks down the code of Shaolin for all true Wu schoolers. There’s even a picture of the original Wu-Tang Clanlogo (made by Wu producer Allah Mathematics), which was far more graphic than the “W.” Part of the 2005 book is dedicated to lyrics, giving an in-depth analysis of each rapper’s rhymes on the Wu’s memorable tracks.


‘The Way I Am,’ Eminem

We all knew that Eminem carried years of aggression just by his lyrics alone. However, in ’09, Marshall Mathers lays it all out in his book. There are old family photos as well as personal gems — more than 200 color and black-and-white in total — and Em goes into detail about his family and his life growing up. It’s a truly candid book about a rapper whose emotional struggles can be heard within every bar he rhymes.


‘And It Don’t Stop: The Best American Hip-Hop Journalism of the Last 25 Years,’ Raquel Cepeda

Journalist Raquel Cepeda collected 29 of the best hip-hop articles over 25 years (from 2004 and back), penned by some of hip-hop’s most prolific writers: Nelson George, Cheo Hodari Coker and Joan Morgan. The pieces range from the early days of the culture to articles on the genre once the tax bracket changed. The book serves as a reminder of the importance that hip-hop journalism continues to serve.


‘Check the Technique: Liner Notes for Hip-Hop Junkies,’ Brian Coleman

This book, published in ’07, is for any hip-hop nerd who wants explanations behind the makings of some of the genre’s notable albums. With artist commentary mixed in, the book, like the title states, is an extensive version of liner notes from the game’s favorite MCs, including the Roots, the Fugees and De La Soul. As digital albums become more popular, more books like this need to hit the shelves.


‘Bling: The Hip-Hop Jewelry Book,’ Gabriel Tolliver, Reggie Osse

Bling, the gift and the curse of hip-hop — and the reason behind most of Kanye West‘s lamentations, next to models and Louis Vuitton bags, of course. While this is a lighthearted approach to the diamond district of hip-hop, the visuals are pretty fun. Released in 2006, it’s a perfect coffee-table book to remind everyone that grills, pimp cups, Jesus pieces and rings worn by the likes of Slick Rick are sought-after jewelry.

25 jul BBoy Summit
"No Easy Props" Organization proudly presents to the world another "BBoy Summit" under the slogan "Cure the World with Hip-Hop".

"No Easy Props" Organization proudly presents to the world another "BBoy Summit" under the slogan "Cure the World with Hip-Hop". 
"BBoy Summit" is a worldwide known battle which takes place in Los Angeles (USA) and has a 20-year history. The permanent main nomination of this event has always been 2x2 breaking battles, but "BBoy Summit" also includes popping and freestyle dance battles, seminars, graffiti shows, performances, cyphers, kids battles and the hip-hop market. 


The rich history of "BBoy Summit" has been highlighted by the big community contribution to the hip-hop culture due to the visual presentation of hip-hop elements along with training seminars, where the worldwide art of Bboying / Bgirling, Deejaying, Emceeing, and Graffiti is described in great detail. This tradition of civil activism and popular art culture has taken root in response to the social and economic oppression and racism.

24 jul Rock Steady Crew 40-th Anniversary
From July 28th to 30th large music festival "Rock Steady 40 Anniversary" will be held in New-York, where "Red Bull BC One New York Cypher...

From July 28th to 30th large music festival "Rock Steady 40 Anniversary" will be held in New-York, where "Red Bull BC One New York Cypher" is going to take place. Over the last years this well-known jam which gathers breaker from all over the planet has grown into a big music hip-hop concert. In the early 90's, when the first "Rock Steady Anniversary" jams in history were arranged, they looked like a cypher of dancers who came together to face off each other and exchange their experience. Years later we can see that this event has become a massive open-air concert bringing together hip-hop stars such as Funk Flex, Tony Touch, Large Professor, Grand Master Caz, Fat Joe, MC Lyte, Mobb Deep, DJ Premier and many other. Aside from the pre-party on July 28th and the main concert on July 30th within the framework of this event New-York preliminary phase for "Red Bull BC One" will take place on July 29th. What makes this "Red Bull BC One" special is that MСs, DJs , and even one of the judges represent the classical school of New-York hip-hop in keeping with the best traditions of "Rock Steady".

21 jul Outbreak 2017
Outbreak Hip-Hop Festival is not only about dance battles and jams, It is a large five-day event which includes workshops, parties, baske...

Outbreak Hip-Hop Festival is not only about dance battles and jams, It is a large five-day event which includes workshops, parties, basketball tournaments, concerts, showcases, competitions and cyphers. 
Within the framework of this festival Outbreak, one of the biggest breaking battles in Europe, is held. Originally Outbreak is 2x2 and 1x1 (footwork) competition which took place on West Coast of the USA and was well known all over the world. Then thanks to enthusiasts from Slovakia MG and MK, who organized qualifications in their country for the famous American battle for the first time, the European Outbreak has outgrown its ancestor. 2x2 is one of the most preferred bboy breaking system and Outbreak is primarily associated with it, whereas the footwork nomination was changed to “Undisputed” 1x1 several years ago. Like many other big battles in Europe and the rest of the world Outbreak claims to be a part of worldwide championship framework and has changed the well appreciated footwork nomination to 1x1 battle to become a contest which opens the doors to absolute championship. 
Outbreak in Slovakia is a European child of the famous American Battle and serves as the qualification phase for it. But in 2012 in Banská Bystrica the world finals were held where Russian and Ukrainian breakers became winners in all nominations. This is very symbolic since a considerable part of Outbreak contestant comprises dancers from Ukraine, Russia and Belarus. 
This time the festival will be held on of July 26th - 30th and as usual is going to be very eventful: the anniversary of the local crew “Hasta la Muerte”, “7toDrink” party, concert stage where on one of the days hip-hop artist will be performing in a continuous stream and a lot more. In order to find out more details and the schedule of Outbreak festival see attached pictures or visit: https://www.facebook.com/events/1875273162711386/?fre...

18 jul Yalta Summer Jam
Every year in the middle of the summer "Yalta Summer Jam", a five-day hip-hop dance and music festival, takes place in Yalta. This festiv...

Every year in the middle of the summer "Yalta Summer Jam", a five-day hip-hop dance and music festival, takes place in Yalta. This festival has a long history which takes its origin in 2001 and during these years it became a traditional pilgrimage destination for many breakers and hip-hop culture enthusiasts. What makes "YSJ" special is its unique geographical location and its history. A cozy town on the south coast of Crimea is the perfect spot for a festival of this kind. This year "YSJ" was held from the 12th to the 16th of July and the basic concept of it was the mixed system of mixed 2x2 battles, where the duos are made by lot. This system was applied to all battles in all nominations. But the winner still must be one dancer, since in the finals the teams are disbanded and everyone battles for himself/herself in four corners. The festival promoters make it their priority to fill the event with various music and give many Djs a chance to rock. 

The tale of "YSJ" would not be complete without mentioning Sream - bboy, DJ, MC and promoter of the festival. Long time, more than 15 years ago he came to the battle in Yalta as an ordinary contestant and 
Around 3 thousand people gather at "YSJ". It is the oldest event in the country. Many people anticipate and prepare for it. Its fame is spreading all around the world. In all over the world it is hard to find a relatively experienced breaker who has not heard about this jam. 
Link to "YSJ" VK community: https://vk.com/yaltasummerjam
Visit "Event calendar" page on our website where the videos from "Yalta Summer Jam 2017" will be uploaded (http://v1battle.ru/?page=addition&type=events).

18 jul New brand of Hip Hop apparel.
"Circle" is a new brand of Hip-Hop apparel founded and designed by b-boy Komar from Top 9 Crew. The first t-shirts were put up for sale d...

"Circle" is a new brand of Hip-Hop apparel founded and designed by b-boy Komar from Top 9 Crew. The first t-shirts were put up for sale during the last sessions of V1 Festival and Yalta Summer Jam and proved to be in high demand. The signature style of this line is consistency of colors and forms. The minimalistic design naturally complements the elements of street graffiti pieces. Stretchy seamless cotton makes the t-shirt light which adds comfort during the dance. Undoubtedly, just in the beginning of its journey "Circle" showed to be a casual fashion brand with a mature style. The first models were produced in a limited quantity, but you can still get them by contacting Komar personally (https://vk.com/bboykomar).

21 jun Contest of Break mixes
For the last month a contest for the best mix has been opened for DJs, record collectors and b-boys who specialize in breaking music. Thi...

For the last month a contest for the best mix has been opened for DJs, record collectors and b-boys who specialize in breaking music. This initiative belongs to Red Bull Company prior to "Red Bull BC One Camp" festival. Conditions of participation - record a fresh beat mix using any equipment, timing - min 30 minutes - max 40 minutes, show the skills of mixing, scratching and DJ technique, show the style and flavor in the track list, upload the mix on vk in the corresponding topic of the "Red Bull BC One Camp" community before June 1st. 5 best works have been selected by the "Red Bull BC One Camp" Russia residents: Soul Dj Smirnoff (Kirishi), South Dj Scream (Yalta), Mr.And-7 aka Dj JD (Moscow). 5 mixes have been selected for an open vote, where the winner was found by the listeners, i.e. the dancers themselves. DJ who got the most votes was Legioner. He has received a prize from Pioneer DJ company. 
The full list of mixes you can find in "Red Bull BC One Camp Russia 2017" Vkontakte community at: https://vk.com/topic-145284699_35660939.

21 jun Freestyle Session - Return of the Full Crews Battles
Freestyle Session is one of the oldest jams in the world hip-hop scene. Traditionally it is held on the West Coast of the USA and attract...

Freestyle Session is one of the oldest jams in the world hip-hop scene. Traditionally it is held on the West Coast of the USA and attracts many b-boys and b-girls from all over the planet. Starting as a local jam in the late 90's Freestyle Session has grown to be a big global competition, preliminaries for which take place all over the globe.

Freestyle Session is a team contest. The VHS tapes, DVDs  and later online videos are known to every breaking scene member in the world and this jam has always been synonymous with the word "crew".

Crew is a team, an integral part of the hip-hop culture and breaking in particular. As a general rule there is no quantitative restriction  in a crew, but when it comes to contests, 10 is the limit. It is and old generally accepted rule which Freestyle Session has been keeping  up to 2011, when following the global trends Freestyle Session became a 3x3 competition.

Six years after in 2017  Freestyle Session is to be held under the slogan "The Return of Complete Crew Battle". It has been awaited and it has happened. It should be noted that in the modern breaking scene of today there is a certain tendency for return of complete crew battles.

20 jun Hip Hop Family Tree
Publishing house White Apple has issued the famous comic book series Hip-Hop Family Tree. Its author Pittsburg artist Ed Piskor tells the...

Publishing house White Apple has issued the famous comic book series Hip-Hop Family Tree. Its author Pittsburg artist Ed Piskor tells the history of the genre from Afrika Bambaattaa to the present days in the form of a graphic novel.

Hip-Hop Family Tree describes the events which took place during the formation of hip-hop as a full-scale culture between late 1970's and mid 1980's.

In 2013 the comic book became a New York Times bestseller graphic novel of the year and the Washington Post included it in the list of 10 graphic novels of 2013.

The first issue deals with the b-boys, graffiti artists, DJs and MCs who became the pioneers of the genre in the late 1970's. Release date - May 2017.

20 jun Breaking at the Olympics
Breaking at the Olympics. In October of 2018 the b-boys/b-girls, born in the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002, will beco...

Breaking at the Olympics.

In October of 2018 the b-boys/b-girls, born in the period from January 1, 2000 to December 31, 2002, will become principal characters of the epic quest with the goal of winning the first golden medals with the five Olympic Rings engraved on them. An innovative qualification system has been integrated to select the best 24 breakers of the world who will compete for the medals at the Youth Olympic Games 2018 in Buenos-Aires in three competitions - "B-boys", "B-girls" and "Mixed Breakbeat Crew". The first of three phases of this unique process is open for everyone without any limitations, except for the age group (16-18 years in 2018). Every self-confident b-boy/b-girl can go after the participation in subsequent phases and, possibly, at 2018 YOG. For this end on has to upload a 45-second video about himself/herself on www.breakingforgold.com in the period from the first week of May to July 31, 2017. The judges at the first preliminaries phase will be famous b-boys and b-girls from various countries: AT, Crazy Legs, Jeskills, Katsu, Lamine, Mounir, Moy, Narumi, Renegade, Storm.

20 jun Hip Hop Boulevard in the Bronx.
The government of New-York (USA) officially declared Sedgwick Avenue “Hip Hop Boulevard". It has been anticipated by many people for a lo...

The government of New-York (USA) officially declared Sedgwick Avenue “Hip Hop Boulevard". It has been anticipated by many people for a long time and some of the biggest names in the hip-hop world came over there to pay tribute to the place where everything began.

1520 Sedgwick Avenue is an unremarkable high-rise apartment building north of Cross Bronx Expressway. Hip-hop was growing all over Bronx but this building became a starting point where Clive Campbell also known as DJ Kool Herc was in charge of the recreation room parties.

This building is the place of residence of famous Kool Herc. DJ Kool Herc is attributed with playing a chief role in the creation of hip-hop and rap music. It all began at a house party at 1520 Sedgwick Avenue on 11 August 1973. Actually hip-hop as a scene was slowly developing in several locations in the 70's but this building became a place where one of the most important events took place which stimulated the evolvement of the hip-hop culture.

20 jun Red Bull BC One Camp
On June 15-17 "Red Bull BC One Camp" was held in Moscow. It is a three-day hip-hop event. For three days on the premises of art space Khl...

On June 15-17 "Red Bull BC One Camp" was held in Moscow. It is a three-day hip-hop event. For three days on the premises of art space Khlebozavod workshops and competitions in breaking, popping, house, beatmaking, sratching, rap freesytle, lecture of world famous hip-hop producer Marley Marl, exhibition of famous photographer Little Shao, film screenings, jams and parties took place. The climax and grand finale of the hip-hop camp was the Russian preliminaries of "Red Bull BC One" where 16 b-boys from all over the country from Vladivostok to Saint Petersburg were battling each other. Zip Rock from Kazan, "Action Man" crew, came out on top and now he is to participate in "Last Chance Cypher", the last preliminary phase, where the winners of many regional preliminaries will meet.